Andrew Heath III and The Heath Family of Virginia

Genealogy for the Heath family's of Saffordshire and surrounding areas.

Andrew Heath III and The Heath Family of Virginia

Postby Donna Tunison » Wed May 31, 2017 3:32 pm

Andrew Heath, III, (Andrews II, Andrew I) inherited his father estate in 1745 in Delaware Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey and it is believed he married Magdalene the same year. In the middle of June 1777, Andrew’s youngest son, Richard was drafted to serve a term in a term in the New Jersey Militia, and Andrew who felt Richard was too young to withstand the fatigues of service, took his place. The troop marched from the company’s headquarters and was engaged in a fray with some Tories, and since it was a hot day, Andrew drank a quantity of water and buttermilk at a farmhouse, and died a few hours after leaving his wife, and children. This story was included in James Snell’s “History of Hunterdon and Somerset Counties, New Jersey (1881)” but was incorrectly identified as William Heath, and retold in the August 1987 issue of the American magazine, “Colonial Homes.” Andrew and Magdalene’s eldest son, Andrew Shelton (abt. 1747-Nov 1817) inherited his father’s estate under the law of primogeniture, and gave his brother John a farm on the east side of the plantation, and his younger brother Richard a farm on the west side. A little over a year later, on 30 Aug 1778, Magdalene remarried Uriah Bonham a neighbor (who helped Magdalena with settling Andrew III's estate), and lived in Kingwood Township until her death in about 1802.

An interesting note, Richard had served a tour of duty in Dec 1776, and was one of the boys/men sent to gather all the boats along the Delaware River to “get out of the way of the British,” in preparation of Washington’s attack on Trenton. Richard did serve in the New Jersey Militia when he was called until the end of the war. Richard married Catherine Rittenhouse and they had ten children, William, Andrew, Elizabeth Heath Hall (mother of Andrew, John Heath and Asa Hall), Jacob, Daniel, Anna, Peter and Benjamin Heath (Delaware Grape).

The Heath Family of Virginia
In 1775, Andrew Shelton Heath purchased 500 acres in Loudoun County, Virginia on Elk Lick Run, (branch of Bull Run Creek, a tributary of the Potomac River), where he would move after his mother’s remarriage. By 1797, he had increased his Virginia land holdings to 760 acres in Loudoun County and 350 acres in neighboring Prince William County. The Bull Run Creek property was sold to his son Isaac in 1806. Many Heath family members are buried on the old Heath homestead in Prince William County, Virginia, but according to someone who surveyed the immediate area, the graves (on private property) are not readable. The Heath homestead (most of the property, if not all, was sold off before the Civil War), but many of Andrew Shelton’s descendants remained in the area.

The first major battle of the American Civil War took place near Andrew Shelton’s homestead, the First Battle of Bull Run/Manassas/Manassas Junction on 21 Jul 1861, about three miles (as the crow flies) from Andrew’s homestead, but 11 miles according to drive by contemporary roads. The area was also the scene the Second Battle of Bull Run/Manassas/Manassas Junction on 28-30 Aug 1862.

This link shows the troops movements during the Battle of First Bull Run:
https://www.civilwar.org/learn/maps/first-manassas-july-21-1861
The National Park Service site has details of both battles:
https://www.nps.gov/mana/index.htm

This map shows the approximate site of the Heath Family graveyard.

Andrew Heath, III, (Andrews II, Andrew I) inherited his father estate in 1745 in Delaware Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey and it is believed he married Magdalene the same year. In the middle of June 1777, Andrew’s youngest son, Richard was drafted to serve a term in a term in the New Jersey Militia, and Andrew who felt Richard was too young to withstand the fatigues of service, took his place. The troop marched from the company’s headquarters and was engaged in a fray with some Tories, and since it was a hot day, Andrew drank a quantity of water and buttermilk at a farmhouse, and died a few hours after leaving his wife, and children. This story was included in James Snell’s “History of Hunterdon and Somerset Counties, New Jersey (1881)” but was incorrectly identified as William Heath, and retold in the August 1987 issue of the American magazine, “Colonial Homes.” Andrew and Magdalene’s eldest son, Andrew Shelton (abt. 1747-Nov 1817) inherited his father’s estate under the law of primogeniture, and gave his brother John a farm on the east side of the plantation, and his younger brother Richard a farm on the west side. A little over a year later, on 30 Aug 1778, Magdalene remarried Uriah Bonham a neighbor (who helped Magdalena with settling Andrew III's estate), and lived in Kingwood Township until her death in about 1802.

An interesting note, Richard had served a tour of duty in Dec 1776, and was one of the boys/men sent to gather all the boats along the Delaware River to “get out of the way of the British,” in preparation of Washington’s attack on Trenton. Richard did serve in the New Jersey Militia when he was called until the end of the war. Richard married Catherine Rittenhouse and they had ten children, William, Andrew, Elizabeth Heath Hall (mother of Andrew, John Heath and Asa Hall), Jacob, Daniel, Anna, Peter and Benjamin Heath (Delaware Grape).

The Heath Family of Virginia
In 1775, Andrew Shelton Heath purchased 500 acres in Loudoun County, Virginia on Elk Lick Run, (branch of Bull Run Creek, a tributary of the Potomac River), where he would move after his mother’s remarriage. By 1797, he had increased his Virginia land holdings to 760 acres in Loudoun County and 350 acres in neighboring Prince William County. The Bull Run Creek property was sold to his son Isaac in 1806. Many Heath family members are buried on the old Heath homestead in Prince William County, Virginia, but according to someone who surveyed the immediate area, the graves (on private property) are not readable. The Heath homestead (most of the property, if not all, was sold off before the Civil War), but many of Andrew Shelton’s descendants remained in the area.

This link shows the troops movements during the Battle of First Bull Run:
https://www.civilwar.org/learn/maps/first-manassas-july-21-1861
The National Park Service site has details of both battles:
https://www.nps.gov/mana/index.htm

This map shows the approximate site of the Heath Family graveyard.

HeathAndrewShelton.JPG
HeathAndrewShelton.JPG (106.09 KiB) Viewed 3945 times


Andrew Shelton married Hannah Smalley and had six children:
1. Isaac (1768-1850) married Sarah Rodgers and had eight children: Alfred, William D., Richard F., Elizabeth, Charles H., John F., Gustavus Isaac, and Frances Ann.
a. Richard moved to Marion County, Missouri, about 1840. He married Rachel Kincaid and had at least three children, the youngest Samuel Franklin Heath died in Montague Co., Texas in 1925.
b. Gustavus Isaac, (Abt 1815-Abt 1893) who sold his Prince William County property in 1857, and moved his family to Indiana before settling in Ray County, Missouri. He was married three times, (1) Elizabeth Chappel (d. Dec 1844) m. Feb 1844; (2) Anna Popkin (d. abt 1850) m. Aug 1848; (3) Irena Smith (1934-1910) m. Dec 1851. Gustavus and Irena had ten children, the youngest Bird Clark Heath died in 1959. Irena’s death was suspicious because authorities could not determine if she committed suicide or if she had been murdered. When neighbors and her son Bird saw that Irena’s house was a blazed they rush to discover when they looked into her bedroom window that her body was lying in bed on fire, with her head on the family Bible and her body covered in either straw or a straw mattress. Local gossiped said that Irena had stashed a large sum of money in the house, and that it had either burned in the fire or had been removed. An inquest held with family members and neighbors gave statements on the events they witnessed at the time, which authorities came to the conclusion that they could not find enough evidence to determine if her death was a result of foul play.


2. Catherine (1769-1846) married Barton Halley and had at least one child, Richard Nelson Halley who married his first cousin, Elizabeth Heath (daughter of Isaac and Sarah Rodgers).

3. Ruhannah/Reuhamah (1773-1851) married twice (1) James McKim (d. 1820) with whom she had a son William McKim (1802-1822); (2) Thomas Buck, m. 1823, and according to another Heath researcher, a few months after the death of his first wife, which upset his children. Ruhannah had slaves prior to her marriage to Buck, and there is a recorded deed of gift from Buck to Ruhannah of the slave Maria and her three children. Professor Ellen Eslinger wrote in “Freedom Without Independence: The Story of a Former Slave and Her Family (Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. 2006) about Ruhannah and who took her slave Maria Cooper and her family under her wing them in reading and writing, and Maria cared for Ruhannah until her death. The 1850 census lists Ruhannah living in Front Royal, Virginia with 13 slaves, which were freed after her death. A Virginia law mandated that manumitted slaves had to leave the state within a year, so Ruhannah’s estate provided a wagon with horses and eight hundred dollars for Maria’s relocation, which they chose Washington, Pennsylvania (about half-way between Pittsburgh, and Wheeling, West Virginia, US Interstate-70 runs through the town) to settle. Eslinger, says initially the family did well after relocation, but Ruhannah’s executor’s show that Maria requested the remainder of her legacy, and it appears she was not granted her request as the account was finally closed in 1859.

4. Sarah (abt. 1777-1850) married Abel James and had one daughter, Susannah.

5. Andrew Shelton II (1779-aft 1837) not much known other than he appears in the 1820 census living in Leesburg, Loudoun County with one white female between the age 26-44 and seven slaves and the 1830 census living in Cameron, Loudoun County with six slaves.

6. Lydia (1781-1837) never married and had her own farm, which was sold at public auction after her death.

Andrew Shelton married Hannah Smalley and had six children:
1. Isaac (1768-1850) married Sarah Rodgers and had eight children: Alfred, William D., Richard F., Elizabeth, Charles H., John F., Gustavus Isaac, and Frances Ann.
a. Richard to Marion County
b. Gustavus Isaac, (Abt 1815-Abt 1893) who sold his Prince William County property in 1857, and moved his family to Indiana before settling in Ray County, Missouri. He was married three times, (1) Elizabeth Chappel (d. Dec 1844) m. Feb 1844; (2) Anna Popkin (d. abt 1850) m. Aug 1848; (3) Irena Smith (1934-1910) m. Dec 1851. Gustavus and Irena had ten children, the youngest Bird Clark Heath died in 1959. Irena’s death was suspicious because authorities could not determine if she committed suicide or if she had been murdered. When neighbors and her son Bird saw that Irena’s house was a blazed they rush to discover when they looked into her bedroom window that her body was lying in bed on fire, with her head on the family Bible and her body covered in either straw or a straw mattress. It was believed and gossiped that Irena had stashed a large sum of money in the house, but it had either burned in the fire or had been removed. An inquest held with family members and neighbors giving statements on the events they witnessed at the time, which authorities came to the conclusion that they could not find enough evidence to determine if her death was a result of foul play.


2. Catherine (1769-1846) married Barton Halley and had at least one child, Richard Nelson Halley who married his first cousin, Elizabeth Heath (daughter of Isaac and Sarah Rodgers).

3. Ruhannah/Reuhamah (1773-1851) married twice (1) James McKim (d. 1820) with whom she had a son William McKim (1802-1822); (2) Thomas Buck, m. 1823, and according to another Heath researcher, a few months after the death of his first wife, which upset his children. Ruhannah had slaves prior to her marriage to Buck, and there is a recorded deed of gift from Buck to Ruhannah of the slave Maria and her three children. Professor Ellen Eslinger wrote in “Freedom Without Independence: The Story of a Former Slave and Her Family (Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. 2006) about Ruhannah and who took her slave Maria Cooper and her family under her wing them in reading and writing, and Maria cared for Ruhannah until her death. The 1850 census lists Ruhannah living in Front Royal, Virginia with 13 slaves, which were freed after her death. A Virginia law mandated that manumitted slaves had to leave the state within a year, so Ruhannah’s estate provided a wagon with horses and eight hundred dollars for Maria’s relocation, which they chose Washington, Pennsylvania (about half-way between Pittsburgh, and Wheeling, West Virginia, US Interstate-70 runs through the town) to settle. Eslinger, says initially the family did well after relocation, but Ruhannah’s executor’s show that Maria requested the remainder of her legacy, and it appears she was not granted her request as the account was finally closed in 1859.

4. Sarah (abt. 1777-1850) married Abel James and had one daughter, Susannah.

5. Andrew Shelton II (1779-aft 1837) not much known other than he appears in the 1820 census living in Leesburg, Loudoun County with one white female between the age 26-44 and seven slaves and the 1830 census living in Cameron, Loudoun County with six slaves.

6. Lydia (1781-1837) never married and had her own farm, which was sold at public auction after her death.
Donna Tunison
 
Posts: 40
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2016 7:12 pm

Andrew Heath III and The Heath Family of Virginia

Postby Donna Tunison » Sat May 09, 2020 2:39 pm

Andrew Heath III burial location

Find a Grave, (at least in the United States) is rapidly becoming almost useless with people putting their genealogy on this site, without any idea where their ancestors are actually buried. My gripe is memorials for 17th, 18th and 19th century ancestors, where the person creates the memorial and does not know, but guesses where someone is buried. Sadly, many grave markers no longer exist or the stones have deteriorated making them unreadable. Burial records are missing or never existed in many areas in the United States, particularly those ancestors buried on the family’s property in rural areas.

The only reason I became aware a memorial had been created for Andrew Heath II and III was after being contacted last year to link my ancestor Richard Heath to a memorial created for his father, Andrew Heath III. My reaction was to doubt that Andrew was buried at the Old Presbyterian Cemetery at Bound Brook, Somerset County, New Jersey. I was familiar with this cemetery after researching my 5x great-grandfather; his second wife, Mary (nee Alward) is buried there. About 100 years ago someone had done a survey and recorded the graves at Old Presbyterian Cemetery and the list is presently available at the Somerset County Library in Boundbrook and Andrew Heath III is not on this list. Another curious thing about the memorial is this person claims Andrew’s middle name is William, not sure where he found this information other than Snell’s book on Somerset and Hunterdon Counties. Snell’s research credibility is lowered after misidentifying Andrew as William. A 01 Apr 1777 Militia roll found in Family Search has Private Andrew Heath serving in the 2nd Regiment New Jersey Militia Roll, with Captain Noble Cumming’s Company, under the command of Col. Israel Shrever, Esq. Maybe it due to Snell having written so much about General William Heath that he inadvertently put Andrew’s name as William.

My grandmother did extensive research of her Heath ancestors in the 1960s and 70s, visiting the library/archives at the statehouse in Trenton (where she worked), as well as the Hunterdon County Historical Society, and graveyards within easy driving distance of her home in Washington Crossing. Louise searched to no avail, the birth parents of Mary, wife of Andrew II, so it is a surprise that someone says it is Horseman and/or Pettit. On Charles Heath Heyl’s application for admittance to the Sons of the American Revolution, he unnecessarily included Andrew Heath II on the application (he died 30 years before the war), as well as his wife, with her maiden name as Pettit. Mary Pettit is not mentioned in any other historical records, including Wills. It would be interesting to know how Heyl determined Mary’s maiden name was Pettit, or was it wishful thinking.

Find a Grave warns people who are creating memorials where the burial location is not known, that the site is not intended for this purpose (this does not include cremations and burials at sea). Too bad it does not include guessing but no definite proof where the person is, as well as theories about the person’s life. Unfortunately this is what the internet has become, information not based on actual fact but on what we would like it to be, or the Hollywood mentality (making an ancestor’s life and embellishing parts of it to make it more entertaining).
Donna Tunison
 
Posts: 40
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2016 7:12 pm


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